Biscriptality : A sociolinguistic typology.

Edition
  • 1st ed.
Published
  • Heidelberg : Universitätsverlag Winter 2016
Physical description
1 online resource (426 pages)
ISBN
  • 9783825376192
  • 9783825366254
Notes
  • Includes bibliographical references (pages 355-401) and indexes.
  • Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Contents
  • Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Contents -- Foreword by Daniel Bunčić -- 1. Introduction (D. Bunčić) -- 1.1. Scope of this study -- 1.2. Notes on terminology and conventions -- 1.2.1. Basic concepts -- 1.2.2. Script variants -- 1.2.3. Names for writing -- 1.2.4. Representation -- 2. History of theoretical research on biscriptality (D. Bunčić) -- 2.1. The context: Sociolinguistics of writing -- 2.2. Concepts of biscriptality before the advent of sociolinguistics -- 2.2.1. Biscriptal documents -- 2.2.1.1. Greek philology: digraphic -- 2.2.1.2. Numismatics: biscriptu(r)al -- 2.2.1.3. Ancient American and Asian studies: bigraphic -- 2.2.2. Biscriptal languages -- 2.3. Sociolinguistic concepts of biscriptality -- 2.3.1. Concepts modelled on diglossia -- 2.3.2. Concepts independent of diglossia -- 2.3.3. Rare meetings of both traditions -- 2.3.4. The state of the art -- 3. A heuristic model for typology (D. Bunčić) -- 3.1. Definition of biscriptality -- 3.2. The sociolinguistic axis: opposition type -- 3.2.1. Privative opposition -- 3.2.2. Equipollent opposition -- 3.2.3. Diasituative variation -- 3.2.4. Summary -- 3.3. The graphematic axis: system level -- 3.4. Synopsis -- 3.5. Adjacent phenomena excluded from the model -- 3.5.1. Biliteracy -- 3.5.2. Complex writing systems and graphic code-switching -- 4. Case studies -- 4.1. Digraphia -- 4.1.1. Medieval Scandinavia: diamesic digraphia (D. Bunčić) -- 4.1.2. Early medieval Ireland: medial digraphia (D. Bunčić) -- 4.1.3. Luvian: medial, diaphasic and/or diastratic digraphia (D. Bunčić) -- 4.1.4. Poljica: diaphasic digraphia (D. Bunčić) -- 4.1.5. Xiangnan Tuhua: gender-based digraphia? (D. Bunčić) -- 4.1.6. Chinese: emerging digraphia? (D. Bunčić) -- 4.1.7. Other cases of digraphia (D. Bunčić) -- 4.2. Diglyphia -- 4.2.1. Russian diaphasic diglyphia (D. Bunčić, E. Kislova, A. Rabus).
  • 4.2.1.1. The introduction of civil type -- 4.2.1.2. The distribution of Old Cyrillic and civil type -- 4.2.1.3. The development in handwriting -- 4.2.1.4. Orthographic differences between Old Cyrillic and civil type -- 4.2.2. Japanese men's and women's hands: diastratic diglyphia (D. Bunčić) -- 4.2.3. Other cases of diglyphia (D. Bunčić) -- 4.3. Diorthographia -- 4.3.1. Thirteenth-century Novgorod: medial diorthographia (D. Bunčić) -- 4.3.1.1. Medieval Novgorod and its orthographies -- 4.3.1.2. The two orthographies -- 4.3.1.3. Chronology of the vernacular orthography -- 4.3.1.4. The distribution of the two orthographies in the 13th century -- 4.3.2. Czech (16th-18th centuries): diamesic diorthographia (D. Bunčić) -- 4.3.3. Other cases of diorthographia (D. Bunčić) -- 4.4. Scriptal pluricentricity -- 4.4.1. Hindi-Urdu (C. Brandt) -- 4.4.1.1. Historical background -- 4.4.1.2. Present situation -- 4.4.1.3. Conclusion -- 4.4.2. Catholic and Orthodox Belarusian (A. Antipova, D. Bunčić) -- 4.4.2.1. The Belarusian Latin alphabet before 1905 -- 4.4.2.2. Belarusian scriptal pluricentricity -- 4.4.2.3. Biscriptality between 1941 and 1944 -- 4.4.3. Serbo-Croatian as a scriptally pluricentric language (D. Bunčić) -- 4.4.3.1. Croatia from the 11th to the 19th century -- 4.4.3.2. Bosnia and Herzegovina in the long 19th century -- 4.4.3.3. Yugoslavia since 1918 -- 4.4.4. Manding and other cases of Ajami literacy in Africa (H. Pasch) -- 4.4.5. Late Egyptian during the 26th dynasty (S. Lippert) -- 4.4.5.1. The development of demotic out of hieratic in its historical context -- 4.4.5.2. The spread of demotic from north to south -- 4.4.6. Other cases of scriptal pluricentricity (D. Bunčić) -- 4.4.6.1. Confessional pluricentricity -- 4.4.6.2. Diatopic pluricentricity -- 4.5. Glyphic pluricentricity.
  • 4.5.1. Orthodox, Muslim and Catholic Cyrillic in Bosnia (D. Bunčić) -- 4.5.2. Medieval Latin (D. Bunčić) -- 4.5.3. Other cases of glyphic pluricentricity (D. Bunčić) -- 4.6. Orthographic pluricentricity -- 4.6.1. Simplified and traditional Chinese (H. Klöter, D. Bunčić) -- 4.6.1.1. Overview -- 4.6.1.2. Two orthographies or glyphic variation -- 4.6.2. Bosnian, Croatian, Montenegrin and Serbian spelling (D. Bunčić) -- 4.6.2.1. Croatian orthographies before standardization -- 4.6.2.2. Modern Croatian and Serbian -- 4.6.2.3. Bosnian and Montenegrin -- 4.6.2.4. Orthography and phonetics -- 4.6.3. English orthographic pluricentricity (D. Bunčić) -- 4.6.4. German orthographic pluricentricity (D. Bunčić) -- 4.6.5. Soviet and emigré Russian (D. Bunčić) -- 4.6.6. Catholic and Protestant Upper Sorbian (D. Bunčić) -- 4.6.7. Two schools of Polish orthography (D. Bunčić) -- 4.6.8. Other cases of orthographic pluricentricity (D. Bunčić) -- 4.7. Bigraphism -- 4.7.1. Serbo-Croatian/Serbian: Cyrillic and Latin (D. Bunčić) -- 4.7.1.1. Serbo-Croatian between 1945 and 1991 -- 4.7.1.2. Serbian in Serbia and Montenegro after 1991 -- 4.7.1.3. Bosnia and Herzegovina after 1995 -- 4.7.1.4. Excursus: Psycholinguistic consequences of bigraphism -- 4.7.2. Rusyn: Minority bigraphism (D. Bunčić, A. Rabus) -- 4.7.3. Bigraphism in Africa: Ajami and Latin (H. Pasch) -- 4.7.4. Old Church Slavonic: Glagolitic and Cyrillic (D. Bunčić, A. Rabus) -- 4.7.5. Egyptian (3000 bce to ca. 400 CE) (A. v. Lieven & S. Lippert) -- 4.7.5.1. Scripts and script variants used in ancient Egypt - hieroglyphs, hieratic and demotic -- 4.7.5.2. Ancient Egyptian and classical terminology as indicators for the perception of factors of script choice -- 4.7.5.3. Medial criteria - writing technique and writing surface -- 4.7.5.4. Text purpose.
  • 4.7.5.5. Associations of certain scripts and script variants with text types or language stages -- 4.7.5.6. Summary -- 4.7.6. Other cases of bigraphism (D. Bunčić) -- 4.8. Biglyphism -- 4.8.1. German: blackletter and roman (J. Spitzmüller, D. Bunčić) -- 4.8.1.1. Blackletter vs. roman: formal differences and typological delimitations -- 4.8.1.2. History of the script variants and emergence of German biscriptality -- 4.8.1.3. When does German biscriptality set in -- 4.8.1.4. Protestantism and the emergence of glyphic ideology -- 4.8.1.5. Biglyphism in German and nationalization of blackletter (1749-1941) -- 4.8.2. Czech: blackletter and roman (D. Bunčić) -- 4.8.3. The Sorbian languages (D. Bunčić) -- 4.8.4. Other cases of biglyphism (D. Bunčić) -- 4.9. Biorthographism -- 4.9.1. Occitan: 'classical' and 'Mistralian' spelling (C. Weth, D. Bunčić) -- 4.9.1.1. Occitan as a regional language -- 4.9.1.2. The 'Mistralian' orthography -- 4.9.1.3. The 'classical' orthography -- 4.9.1.4. Factors for script choice -- 4.9.2. Belarusian: Taraškevica and Narkamauka (D. Bunčić) -- 4.9.3. Other cases of biorthographism (D. Bunčić) -- 5. Diachronic observations (D. Bunčić) -- 5.1. Biscriptality in the history of Serbo-Croatian -- 5.2. Biscriptality in the history of Belarusian -- 5.3. Semiotic values ascribed to writing systems -- 5.4. Power relations -- 6. Conclusion (D. Bunčić) -- 6.1. Evaluation of the heuristic model -- 6.2. Relative frequencies of the types of biscriptality -- 6.3. The dynamics of the types of biscriptality -- 6.4. Perspectives -- Table of figures and their sources -- Works cited -- Indexes -- Index of languages -- Index of writing systems -- Index of personal names.
Related item
Genre
  • Electronic books.
  • text
Language
  • English
Cover image
book
E-resource
Printed resource

Export: