Herod : king of the Jews and friend of the Romans / Peter Richardson and Amy Marie Fisher.

Author
Edition
  • Second edition.
Published
  • Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY : Routledge 2018
Physical description
xxx, 458 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
ISBN
  • 9781138803923
  • 1138803928
  • 9781315163352
  • 1315163357
Notes
  • First edition published: Columbia, S.C. : University of South Carolina Press, 1996.
  • Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
  • Description based on print version record.
Contents
  • "The achievements of King Herod" 1 -- A century of studies of Herod (from Otto to Vermes and Marshak) 4 -- Beginnings 5 -- Classic studies 6 -- The last two decades 11 -- Conclusion 15 -- Josephus's accounts of Herod's life 16 -- Sources 16 -- Historiography 17 -- Narrative 18 -- Rhetoric 18 -- Conclusion 19 -- Chronology of Herod's life 19 -- Schematic family tree 30 -- Part I and Part II 30 -- Part I Herod's life 37 -- 1 In the end is the beginning 39 -- The eagle, or a king's eclipse 39 -- Death of a king 41 -- Family squabbles in Rome 43 -- Augustus's indecision 49 -- The delegations' evaluations 53 -- Herod and the Roman Jewish community 56 -- 2 From Idumea to Petra (to 64 BCE) 60 -- Introduction 60 -- Idumeans 61 -- Nabateans 69 -- Itureans 73 -- Hasmoneans 77 -- Hyrcanus II and Aristobulus II 80 -- Antipater 82 -- 3 From Petra to Rome (64-40 BCE) 87 -- Pompey, Gabinius, and Antipater's rise to power 87 -- Caesar and Cassius 93 -- Herod's trial 98 -- Civil war 103 -- Parthia 107 -- Herod and Antigonus 109 -- King of Judea 115 -- 4 From Rome to Rhodes (40-30 BCE) 119 -- Up to Jerusalem: the first season's campaign 119 -- Up to Jerusalem: the second season's campaign 123 -- The battle for Jerusalem 124 -- Alexandra, Cleopatra, and the death of Aristobulus III 128 -- Nabatean war 131 -- The end of Hyrcanus II 134 -- Herod meets Octavian at Rhodes 136 -- 5 From Rhodes to Rome (30-17 BCE) 140 -- Mariamme's execution 140 -- Appended note 142 -- The deaths of Alexandra and Costobar 144 -- Judean society 145 -- Herod and Augustus 149 -- Amici 151 -- Princeps and king 155 -- Internal matters 160 -- To Rome 163 -- 6 From Rome to Jericho (17-4 BCE) 166 -- Augustus, Marcus Agrippa, and Herod 166 -- The Diaspora 168 -- A synagogue in Rome? 170 -- The decrees 172 -- Suit of Ionian Jews 173 -- Benefactions 175 -- The household 175 -- To Rome again 179 -- The Nabatean War (12-9 BCE) 180 -- In Jerusalem 182 -- Archelaus, Eurycles, and Eunuchs 184 -- The execution of Alexander and Aristobulus 186 -- Antipater's end 187 -- Conclusion 192 -- Part II Herod in context 197 -- 7 Late Hellenism in the Levant 199 -- Syria 199 -- Dependent kingdoms 201 -- The Decapolis 206 -- The coastal cities 209 -- Conclusion 212 -- 8 The kingdom 215 -- Galilee 215 -- Judea 219 -- Samaritis 223 -- Gaulanitis, Batanea, Auranitis, and Trachonitis 225 -- Perea 229 -- Conclusion 231 -- 9 Herod's architecture and archaeological remains 235 -- Establishment of the kingdom 243 -- The early years: building small, but luxuriously 243 -- The post-Actium building phase: expansion 249 -- Creation of a legacy 257 -- Masada: the cascading palace 257 -- Herodium: fortress and palace 259 -- Caesarea Maritima: city on the sea 265 -- Interlude: the third Temple to Roma and Augustus 273 -- Jericho: the third and final palace 274 -- The Temple and the Temple Mount in Jerusalem 276 -- Herodium: mausoleum 278 -- Other building projects 281 -- Conclusion 285 -- 10 Herod's finances: inscriptions, coins, and economy 290 -- Inscriptions 290 -- Inscriptions of Agrippa I and Agrippa II 299 -- Contextual inscriptions from Herod's time 301 -- Persons in Herod's story 303 -- Conclusion 306 -- Numismatics 306 -- Herod's coins 309 -- The symbols on the coins 310 -- The mint(s) of Herod's coins 316 -- Economy of Herod's kingdom 319 -- 11 Religious and military elites 329 -- Introduction 329 -- Herod and the priestly elite 329 -- Josephus's account of Herod and the temple 337 -- Herod and groups or parties 340 -- Brigands 340 -- Sadducees 342 -- Pharisees 343 -- Essenes 345 -- Herodians 347 -- Conclusion 348 -- Herod's army and. navy: a military elite 350 -- Army 350 -- Navy 352 -- Infrastructure 353 -- Conclusion 357 -- 12 Family matters 361 -- Herod's wills 361 -- Will one (23/22 BCE) 362 -- Will two (14/13 BCE) 363 -- Will three (12 BCE) 363 -- Will four (7 BCE) 363 -- Will five (6 BCE) 364 -- Will six (5/4 BCE) 364 -- Will seven (4 BCE) 364 -- Herod's intentions 365 -- Family wealth 366 -- Dowry 366 -- Indirect dowry and bridewealth 367 -- Inheritance 367 -- Genealogy and descent 368 -- Family tree 368 -- Marriage and divorce 370 -- Endogamy 370 -- Exogamy 370 -- Restrictions 370 -- Divorce 371 -- Conclusion 371 -- Herod's courtiers at work 372 -- Religion 372 -- Military 372 -- Sharing the rule 373 -- Counselors 374 -- Appendix 1 Herod's family tree 375 -- Appendix 2 Nikos Kokkinos's chronology of Herod's wives 383 -- 13 The Herods in Roman perspective 387 -- Pompey, Mark Antony, and Julius Caesar 387 -- Octavian 389 -- Excursus: the massacre of the innocents 390 -- Augustus, Herod, and Archelaus 391 -- Excursus: a New Testament throne story 392 -- Augustus, Livia, Archelaus, and Philip 392 -- Tiberius 394 -- Tiberius and Antipas 394 -- Excursus: Jesus's trial 396 -- Gaius 397 -- Gaius and Antipas 397 -- Gaius and Marcus Julius Agrippa I 397 -- Claudius 400 -- Claudius and Agrippa I 400 -- Excursus: Paul and Felix and Drusilla 402 -- Nero 402 -- Nero and Agrippa II 402 -- Excursus: Festus and Paul 403 -- The 60s and 70s ce 403 -- Vespasian 404 -- Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian 404 -- Titus 405 -- Domitian 406 -- Flavius Clemens and Flavia Domitilla 406 -- Nerva 407 -- Conclusion 409.
Other names
Related item
Genre
  • Bibliography
  • Biographies.
  • Biography
  • collective biographies.
  • History.
  • Illustrated
  • text
Language
  • English

Summary

  • "Herod examines the life of this controversial figure, the most highly visible of the Roman client kings under Augustus, whose rule shaped the world in which Christianity arose. In this expanded second edition, additions include discussion of the archaeological evidence of Herod's activity, his building program, numismatic evidence, and consideration of the roles and activities of other client kings, making this a valuable tool for those interested in the wider Roman world of the late first century BCE. With new maps, architectural drawings, and numerous photographs, Herod remains the definitive study of the life and activities of the king known traditionally as Herod the Great."--Provided by publisher.

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Location of copy Shelfmark Online location Holdings Notes
Cardiff University Libraries: Contact the Arts and Social Sciences Library DS122.3.R4
Queen's University Belfast: McClay Floor 1 DS122.3
Royal Holloway, University of London: Contact the Library Ebook Central Ebook Central Please note that the platform supports unlimited access
University of Southampton Library: Hartley Library: Parkes Library (Standard Loan) Parkes BZ1671.R52

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